Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III:Chronographic-Literary Styles and the King's Portrait

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Author(s)

    • YAMADA Shigeo
    • Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba

Abstract

The article examines the chronographic styles and literary features of the major inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III, king of Assyria (745-727 BC), and discusses the characteristics of the king's self-presentation expressed there. First, the article deals with the structure of the king's major inscriptions, while discussing the date and circumstances of their composition. Then, it examines Tiglath-pileser III's self-presentation in those inscriptions, paying attention to the traditions and innovations involved therein. The examination reveals two major points concerning the royal image presented by Tiglath-pileser III's inscriptions, i.e., (1) the revival of the traditional image of the king as the great commander, who unremittingly marches and conquers distant lands, and (2) the innovative image as the absolute imperial builder-administrator, who reorganizes the world on a solid provincial system. The self-presentation was obviously made against the historical background of the king's reign, in which he established the foundation of Assyrian empire following the long period of turmoil and political instability during the reigns of his predecessors.

Journal

  • Orient

    Orient 49(0), 31-50, 2014

    The Society for Near Eastern Studies in Japan

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005530636
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0473-3851
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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