Acquired Fanconi syndrome in two dogs following long-term consumption of pet jerky treats in Japan: case report

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Author(s)

    • YABUKI Akira
    • Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Kohrimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
    • IWANAGA Tomoko
    • Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Kohrimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
    • GIGER Urs
    • Section of Medical Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Delancey St, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6010, U.S.A.
    • SAWA Mariko
    • Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Kohrimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
    • KOHYAMA Moeko
    • Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Kohrimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan
    • YAMATO Osamu
    • Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Kohrimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065, Japan

Abstract

<p>Renal Fanconi syndrome has recently been associated with the ingestion of pet jerky treats from China in mostly small breed dogs in North America, Australia and Europe. We report here about two dogs with Fanconi syndrome following pet jerky treats exposure in Japan. A mixed-breed dog and a French bulldog showed weight loss, polyuria and polydipsia. For years, the owners had been feeding large quantities of pet jerky treats containing chicken prepared in China. Diagnostics revealed glycosuria without hyperglycemia, severe aminoaciduria, and in one case also ketonuria, hypokalemia and metabolic acidosis. A diagnosis of Fanconi syndrome associated with long-term consumption of Chinese pet jerky treats was made. Both dogs recovered fully following withdrawal of the pet jerky treats and supportive care. Fanconi syndrome of dogs in association with the consumption of pet jerky treats of Chinese origin can cause a broad proximal tubular defect with glycosuria and generalized amino aciduria, and should be also considered in Asia. Jerky treats associated Fanconi syndrome can be completely reversible following withdrawal of the treats and supportive care to correct the metabolic abnormalities.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 79(5), 818-821, 2017

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005635452
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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