Pathological lesions in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues of <i>dd</i>Y mice with street rabies virus (1088 strain)

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Author(s)

    • KIMITSUKI Kazunori
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1, Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
    • YAMADA Kentaro
    • Research Promotion Project, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka, Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Japan
    • SHIWA Nozomi
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1, Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan
    • INOUE Satoshi
    • Department of Veterinary Science, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Toyama 1-23-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8640 Japan
    • NISHIZONO Akira
    • Research Promotion Project, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka, Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Japan|Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, 1-1 Idaigaoka, Hasama-machi, Yufu, Oita 879-5593, Japan
    • PARK Chun-Ho
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23-35-1, Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034-8628, Japan

Abstract

<p>Most studies on rabies virus pathogenesis in animal models have employed fixed rabies viruses, and the results of those employing street rabies viruses have been inconsistent. Therefore, to clarify the pathogenesis of street rabies virus (1088 strain) in mice, 10<sup>6</sup> focus forming units were inoculated into the right hindlimb of <i>dd</i>Y mice (6 weeks, female). At 3 days postinoculation (DPI), mild inflammation was observed in the hindlimb muscle. At 5 DPI, ganglion cells in the right lumbosacral spinal dorsal root ganglia showed chromatolysis. Axonal degeneration and inflammatory cells increased with infection progress in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia. Right hindlimb paralysis was observed from 7 DPI, which progressed to quadriparalysis. However, no pathological changes were observed in the ventral horn and root fibers of the spinal cord. Viral antigen was first detected in the right hindlimb muscle at 3 DPI, followed by the right lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia, dorsal horn of spinal cord, left red nuclei, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex (M1 area) at 5 DPI. These results suggested that the 1088 virus ascended the lumbosacral spinal cord via mainly afferent fibers at early stage of infection and moved to cerebral cortex (M1 area) using descending spinal tract. Additionally, we concluded that significant pathological changes in mice infected with 1088 strain occur in the sensory tract of the spinal cord; this selective susceptibility results in clinical features of the disease.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 79(6), 970-978, 2017

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005695725
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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