The association between changes in lifestyle behaviors and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older men

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Author(s)

    • Michishita Ryoma
    • Department of Health Development, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health|The Fukuoka University Institute for Physical Activity
    • Matsuda Takuro
    • The Fukuoka University Institute for Physical Activity|Department of Rehabilitation, Fukuoka University Hospital
    • Kawakami Shotaro
    • Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Fukuoka University
    • Tanaka Satoshi
    • Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Fukuoka University
    • Tanaka Hiroaki
    • The Fukuoka University Institute for Physical Activity|Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Fukuoka University
    • Morito Natsumi
    • Fukuoka University Health Care Center|Department of Cardiology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine
    • Higaki Yasuki
    • The Fukuoka University Institute for Physical Activity|Laboratory of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Health and Sports Science, Fukuoka University

Abstract

<p><i>Background:</i> This study was designed to evaluate whether changes in lifestyle behaviors are correlated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD).</p><p><i>Methods:</i> The subjects consisted of 316 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or renal dysfunction or dialysis treatment. The following lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire: habitual moderate exercise, daily physical activity, walking speed, eating speed, late-night dinner, bedtime snacking, skipping breakfast, and drinking and smoking habits. The subjects were divided into four categories according to the change in each lifestyle behavior from baseline to the end of follow-up (healthy–healthy, unhealthy–healthy, healthy–unhealthy and unhealthy–unhealthy).</p><p><i>Results:</i> A multivariate analysis showed that, with respect to habitual moderate exercise and late-night dinner, maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for the incidence of CKD than maintaining a lifestyle (OR 8.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–15.40 for habitual moderate exercise and OR 4.00; 95% CI, 1.38–11.57 for late-night dinner). In addition, with respect to bedtime snacking, the change from a healthy to an unhealthy lifestyle and maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in significantly higher OR for incidence of CKD than maintaining a healthy lifestyle (OR 4.44; 95% CI, 1.05–13.93 for healthy–unhealthy group and OR 11.02; 95% CI, 2.83–26.69 for unhealthy–unhealthy group).</p><p><i>Conclusions:</i> The results of the present study suggest that the lack of habitual moderate exercise, late-night dinner, and bedtime snacking may increase the risk of CKD.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 27(8), 389-397, 2017

    Japan Epidemiological Association

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