Low Serum Levels of EPA are Associated with the Size and Growth Rate of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

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Author(s)

    • Aikawa Tatsuro
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Hiki Masaru
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Takahashi Shuhei
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Al Shahi Hamad
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Dohi Shizuyuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Amano Atsushi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Daida Hiroyuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Miyazaki Tetsuro
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Shimada Kazunori
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Sugita Yurina
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Shimizu Megumi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Ouchi Shohei
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Kadoguchi Tomoyasu
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Yokoyama Yasutaka
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Shiozawa Tomoyuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine

Abstract

<p><b><i>Aim</i>:</b> Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been reported to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, whether omega-3 PUFAs are involved in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) remains unclear.</p><p><b><i>Methods</i>:</b> We analyzed 67 consecutive patients admitted for the elective surgical repair of AAA. We investigated the association of serum EPA and DHA levels as well as the EPA/AA ratio with the size of AAA assessed using three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography images.</p><p><b><i>Results</i>:</b> Mean patient age was 70±9 years and 60 patients were male. Serum EPA and DHA levels were 75.2±35.7 μg/mL and 146.1±48.5 μg/mL, respectively. EPA/AA ratio was 0.44±0.22, which was lower than those in healthy Japanese subject and equivalent to those in Japanese patients with coronary artery disease as previously reported. Mean of the maximum AAA diameter was 56.4±8.9 mm, and serum EPA levels and EPA/AA ratio negatively correlated with it (<i>r</i>=−0.32 and <i>r</i>=−0.32, respectively). Multiple liner regression analysis showed that EPA levels were significant independent factor contributing to the maximum AAA diameter. Furthermore, low serum EPA levels and low EPA/AA ratio were significantly associated with the growth rate of AAA diameter (<i>r</i>=−0.43 and <i>r</i>=−0.33, respectively).</p><p><b><i>Conclusion</i>:</b> EPA levels in patients with AAA were relatively low. Low serum EPA levels and EPA/AA ratio were associated with the size and growth rate of AAA.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

    Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis 24(9), 912-920, 2017

    Japan Atherosclerosis Society

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006038434
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1340-3478
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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