Spatially Resolved Distribution of Fe Species around Microbes at the Submicron Scale in Natural Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides

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Author(s)

    • SUGA HIROKI Suga Hiroki
    • Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Graduate School of Science (DEPSS), Hiroshima University
    • KIKUCHI SAKIKO Takahashi Yoshio
    • Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Graduate School of Science (DEPSS), Hiroshima University|Institute of Materials Structure Science, High-Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)|Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo
    • TAKEICHI YASUO Kikuchi Sakiko
    • Project Team for Development of New-Generation Research Protocol for Submarine Resources, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
    • MIYAMOTO CHIHIRO Takeichi Yasuo
    • Institute of Materials Structure Science, High-Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)|Department of Materials Structure Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies)
    • ONO KANTA Mase Kazuhiko
    • Institute of Materials Structure Science, High-Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)|Department of Materials Structure Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies)
    • TAKAHASHI YOSHIO Ono Kanta
    • Institute of Materials Structure Science, High-Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK)|Department of Materials Structure Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies)

Abstract

<p>Natural bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) were investigated using local-analyzable synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with a submicron-scale resolution. Cell, cell sheath interface (EPS), and sheath in the BIOS were clearly depicted using C-, N-, and O- near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) obtained through STXM measurements. Fe-NEXAFS obtained from different regions of BIOS indicated that the most dominant iron mineral species was ferrihydrite. Fe(II)- and/or Fe(III)-acidic polysaccharides accompanied ferrihydrite near the cell and EPS regions. Our STXM/NEXAFS analysis showed that Fe species change continuously between the cell, EPS, and sheath under several 10-nm scales.</p>

Journal

  • Microbes and Environments

    Microbes and Environments 32(3), 283-287, 2017

    Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology · The Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006105328
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11551577
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1342-6311
  • NDL Article ID
    028525006
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-J644
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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