Association of food access and neighbor relationships with diet and underweight among community-dwelling older Japanese Association of food access and neighbor relationships with diet and underweight among community-dwelling older Japanese

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Author(s)

    • Nakamura Hideko
    • School of Nursing, Seirei Christopher University|Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine
    • Nakamura Mieko
    • Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine
    • Okada Eisaku
    • Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine
    • Ojima Toshiyuki
    • Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine
    • Kondo Katsunori
    • Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University|Department of Gerontological Evaluation, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology

Abstract

Background: Food access is important for maintaining dietary variety, which predicts underweight. The aim of this study was to examine the association of food access and neighbor relationships with eating and underweight.Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 102,869 Japanese individuals aged 65 years or older. The perceived availability of food was assessed using the presence or absence of food stores within 1 km of the home. Level of relationships with neighbors was also assessed. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for infrequent food intake and underweight were determined using logistic regression analysis.Results: The proportion of men and women having low access to food was 25-30%. Having low food access (OR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.25 for men and OR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1.33 for women) and a low level of relationship with neighbors (OR 1.38; 95% CI, 1.31-1.45 for men and OR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48-1.67 for women) was associated with infrequent intake of fruits and vegetables in both sexes. Association between low food access and infrequent intake of fruits and vegetables was higher among men with low levels of neighbor relationship (OR 1.34; 95% CI, 1.23-1.46) than among men with high levels of relationship (OR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03-1.18).Conclusions: Low perceived availability of food is a risk factor for low dietary variety among older people. Furthermore, high levels of relationship with neighbors may relieve the harmful effect of low food access.   © 2017 The Authors. Publishing services by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of The Japan Epidemiological Association. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0/).

<p><i>Background:</i> Food access is important for maintaining dietary variety, which predicts underweight. The aim of this study was to examine the association of food access and neighbor relationships with eating and underweight.</p><p><i>Methods:</i> We analyzed cross-sectional data from 102,869 Japanese individuals aged 65 years or older. The perceived availability of food was assessed using the presence or absence of food stores within 1 km of the home. Level of relationships with neighbors was also assessed. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for infrequent food intake and underweight were determined using logistic regression analysis.</p><p><i>Results:</i> The proportion of men and women having low access to food was 25–30%. Having low food access (OR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12–1.25 for men and OR 1.26; 95% CI, 1.19–1.33 for women) and a low level of relationship with neighbors (OR 1.38; 95% CI, 1.31–1.45 for men and OR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.48–1.67 for women) was associated with infrequent intake of fruits and vegetables in both sexes. Association between low food access and infrequent intake of fruits and vegetables was higher among men with low levels of neighbor relationship (OR 1.34; 95% CI, 1.23–1.46) than among men with high levels of relationship (OR 1.10; 95% CI, 1.03–1.18).</p><p><i>Conclusions:</i> Low perceived availability of food is a risk factor for low dietary variety among older people. Furthermore, high levels of relationship with neighbors may relieve the harmful effect of low food access.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 27(11), 546-551, 2017

    Japan Epidemiological Association

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006139938
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10952696
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    0917-5040
  • Data Source
    IR  J-STAGE 
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