Tritium and iodine-129 concentrations in precipitation at Tsukuba, Japan, after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

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Abstract

<p>The earthquake off the Pacific coast of Japan and the subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011, triggered a series of accidents in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1). The accidents caused the release of a mixture of radioactive substances into the environment. This study measured the concentration of tritium (<sup>3</sup>H) and iodine-129 (<sup>129</sup>I) in rainwater samples collected at Tsukuba, 170 km southwest of the plant, during the year following the accident. High <sup>3</sup>H concentrations were observed in the rainwater samples collected within one month after the FNPP1 accident. <sup>3</sup>H concentrations decreased steadily over time and returned to the levels before the accident. Concentrations of <sup>129</sup>I also decreased over time. However, pulses of high <sup>129</sup>I concentrations were observed at several other times following the accident. The <sup>129</sup>I concentrations were found to be correlated with iron concentrations in rainwater. It is likely that iron oxide, which can absorb iodate ions (IO<sub>3</sub><sup>–</sup>), was the carrier of radiogenic iodine. This study concludes that <sup>129</sup>I and also <sup>131</sup>I, which is one of the most harmful radionuclides produced in nuclear reactors, can be redistributed to the atmosphere in the months following the deposition of radiogenic iodine on the ground.</p>

Journal

  • GEOCHEMICAL JOURNAL

    GEOCHEMICAL JOURNAL 51(5), 449-455, 2017

    GEOCHEMICAL SOCIETY OF JAPAN

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006146243
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA00654975
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0016-7002
  • NDL Article ID
    028583503
  • NDL Call No.
    Z53-R488
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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