High-Pressure and High-Temperature Carbon Isotope Fractionation in the Fe-C System : Implications for Carbon Dynamics in the Deep Earth (特集 地球深部における化学的不均質)  [in Japanese] High-Pressure and High-Temperature Carbon Isotope Fractionation in the Fe-C System: Implications for Carbon Dynamics in the Deep Earth  [in Japanese]

Access this Article

Search this Article

Author(s)

Abstract

Carbon, the fourth most abundant element in the solar system, is believed to be an important light element constituent in the Earth's core. The high carbon content of carbonaceous chondrites (3.2 wt.%) compared to bulk earth estimates, the presence of graphite/diamond and metal carbides in Iron meteorites, the high solubility of carbon into iron melts in the Fe-C system, all suggests the plausible presence of carbon in the Earth's core. However, the distribution of carbon isotopes in the core and deep mantle remains elusive. Newly reported experimental data and theoretical estimates on equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation between graphite/diamond and carbide phases suggests that iron carbide melt will preferentially gather <sup>12</sup>C than <sup>13</sup>C. These results are consistent with the carbon isotope distribution between graphite and cohenite (Fe<sub>3</sub>C) observed in iron meteorites. The temperature dependent fractionation of carbon isotopes between carbide phases and elemental carbon can be an effective mechanism that might have created a <sup>12</sup>C-enriched core. If the Earth's core is a large reservoir of <sup>12</sup>C-enriched carbon, then it can result in large perturbations in surface carbon cycle caused by the flux of isotopically lighter carbon from the core-mantle boundary.<br>

Journal

  • The Review of High Pressure Science and Technology

    The Review of High Pressure Science and Technology 27(4), 278-283, 2017

    The Japan Society of High Pressure Science and Technology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006338337
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AN10452913
  • Text Lang
    JPN
  • ISSN
    0917-639X
  • NDL Article ID
    028849625
  • NDL Call No.
    Z17-1589
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
Page Top