Sex and site differences in urinary excretion of conjugated pyrene metabolites in the West African Shorthorn cattle

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Author(s)

    • BORTEY-SAM Nesta
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan
    • IKENAKA Yoshinori
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan|Water Research Group, Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
    • AKOTO Osei
    • Department of Chemistry, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
    • NAKAYAMA Shouta M.M.
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan
    • MARFO Jemima T.
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan
    • SAENGTIENCHAI Aksorn
    • Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand
    • MIZUKAWA Hazuki
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan
    • ISHIZUKA Mayumi
    • Laboratory of Toxicology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 9, Kita ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-818, Japan

Abstract

<p>Industrialization, economic and population growth rates in Ghana have increased the release of contaminants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into the environment through which humans and animals are exposed. Cattle is reported to be exposed to high levels of PAHs through feed and inhalation. Once exposed, PAHs are metabolized and excreted in urine, feces or bile. In a previous study, cattle in Ghana was reported to excrete high levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr) due to high exposure to the parent compound, pyrene. 1-OHPyr is further metabolized to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the sex and site differences in urinary excretion of conjugated pyrene metabolites using cattle urine collected from rural and urban sites of the Ashanti region, Ghana. From the results, geometric mean concentration adjusted by specific gravity indicated that 1-OHPyreneGlucuronide (PyG) was the most abundant conjugate followed by PyrenediolSulfate (M3). The sum of conjugated pyrene metabolites and sum of both conjugated and deconjugated pyrene metabolites correlated significantly with PyG, PydiolSulfate (M2) and PydiolSulfate (M3). The study revealed no significant difference in urinary excretion of conjugated pyrene metabolites between rural and urban sites. This indicated that similar to urban sites, cattle in rural sites were exposed to high levels of pyrene. There was no significant difference in urinary concentrations of conjugated pyrene metabolites between sexes.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 80(2), 375-381, 2018

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006410766
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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