CLIMATE CHANGE IN VIETNAM'S MEKONG DELTA: SOC TRANG RICE FARMERS' PERCEPTIONS AND ADAPTIVE BEHAVIORS

Access this Article

Author(s)

Abstract

<p>   Dramatic changes in climatic conditions have precipitated increases in the severity and frequency with which saltwater intrusions occur in Vietnam's Mekong Delta. These intrusions threaten agricultural sustainability and rural livelihoods. Little research has explored how rural farmers perceive this threat, and what factors influence them to change farming practices to adapt to the altered environment. This study attempts to understand how rice farmers in Soc Trang province perceive and respond to saltwater intrusions. This geographical area is a main agricultural region in Vietnam's Mekong Delta. Data were obtained from interviews with 80 rice farmers and four key agricultural officers in two districts of Soc Trang province. Results found that farmers are becoming aware of the relationship between climate change and saltwater intrusions, and that this awareness is significantly influenced by educational levels and numerous sources of both informal and formal information. In addition, characteristics related to a farm's location, including its access to water sources, when combined with access to information, appeared likely to influence Soc Trang farmers' risk perceptions. Individual farmers have responded to the now-irregular and intensifying saltwater intrusions by implementing both intentional and unintentional adaptations. Further, significant differences were observed between local adaptation strategies in various geographical locations at the district level. The absence of a strong correlation between Soc Trang rice farmers' perceptions of risks and their decisions to implement adaptive responses was also observed. This suggests that having knowledge of a threat is not sufficient to motivate individuals to take steps to mitigate it.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Environmental Science for Sustainable Society

    Journal of Environmental Science for Sustainable Society 8(0), 1-14, 2017

    Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006594564
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
Page Top