A Rare Coexistence of Pheochromocytoma and Parkinson's Disease With Diagnostic Challenges A Rare Coexistence of Pheochromocytoma and Parkinson's Disease With Diagnostic Challenges

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Author(s)

    • Sato Taiki
    • Department of Pathology, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Hara Hisato
    • Department of Surgery, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Suzuki Hiroaki
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Shimano Hitoshi
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Sekiya Motohiro
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Omoto-Inuzuka Miyoko
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Santo Kana
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Shikama Akito
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Kuba Motoko
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Sugano Yoko
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Iwasaki Hitoshi
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Yatoh Shigeru
    • Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology and Metabolism), University of Tsukuba, Japan

Abstract

<p>We herein report a case of pheochromocytoma occurring in the course of Parkinson's disease. The coexistence of these two disease is extremely rare, with only four cases hitherto reported across the public databases. It is also noteworthy that biochemical tests, which are critical for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma, are severely confounded by dopaminergic medications for Parkinson's disease, highlighting the importance of image-based modalities in this setting. We further attempted to gain insight into the potential molecular mechanisms, proposing that hypoxia-inducible factor signaling could make these two diseases mutually exclusive, while excessive reactive oxygen species could enable their coexistence. </p>

Journal

  • Internal Medicine

    Internal Medicine 57(7), 979-985, 2018

    Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

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