Impact of the Great East Japan Earthquake on Body Mass Index, Weight, and Height of Infants and Toddlers: An Infant Survey

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Author(s)

    • Ono Atsushi
    • Department of Paediatrics, Fukushima Medical University
    • Kuriyama Shinichi
    • Department of Disaster Public Health, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University|Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University|Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Tohoku University
    • Matsubara Hiroko
    • Department of Disaster Public Health, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University
    • Ishikuro Mami
    • Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University|Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Tohoku University
    • Kikuya Masahiro
    • Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization, Tohoku University|Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Tohoku University
    • Yokoya Susumu
    • Center for Clinical Research Data, National Center for Child Health and Development
    • Kato Noriko
    • Department of Early Childhood Care and Education, Jumonji University

Abstract

<p><b>Background:</b> The body mass index (BMI) of preschool children from 4 years of age through primary school has increased since the Great East Japan Earthquake, but that of children aged under 3 years has not been studied. This study evaluated how the anthropometrics of younger children changed following the earthquake.</p><p><b>Methods:</b> Height and weight data of children living in northeast Japan were collected from 3-, 6-, 18-, and 42-month child health examinations. We compared the changes in BMI, weight, and height among infants affected by the earthquake between their 3- and 6-month health examinations, toddlers affected at 21–30 months of age (affected groups), and children who experienced the earthquake after their 42-month child health examination (unaffected group). A multilevel model was used to calculate the BMI at corresponding ages and to adjust for the actual age at the 3-month health examination, health examination interval, and gestational age.</p><p><b>Results:</b> We recruited 8,479 boys and 8,218 girls living in Fukushima, Miyagi, and Iwate Prefectures. In the infants affected between their 3- and 6-month health examinations in Fukushima, the change in BMI at 42 months of age was greater than among the unaffected children. In the toddlers affected at 21–30 months of age in Fukushima, the change in BMI was greater, but changes in weight and height were less.</p><p><b>Conclusions:</b> Affected infants and toddlers in Fukushima suggested some growth disturbances and early adiposity rebound, which can cause obesity. The future growth of children affected by disasters should be followed carefully.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 28(5), 237-244, 2018

    Japan Epidemiological Association

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006732097
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0917-5040
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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