Understory Dwarf Bamboo Affects Microbial Community Structures and Soil Properties in a <i>Betula ermanii</i> Forest in Northern Japan

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Author(s)

    • Kong Bihe
    • Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University
    • Chen Lei
    • Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University
    • Ono Kiyomi
    • Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University
    • Wild Jan
    • Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University
    • Nagatake Arata
    • Soil Science Laboratory, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University
    • Hatano Ryusuke
    • Soil Science Laboratory, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University

Abstract

<p>In order to understand the relationships between understory bamboo and soil properties, we compared microbial community structures in the soil of a <i>Betula ermanii</i> boreal forest with <i>Sasa kurilensis</i> present and removed using high-throughput DNA sequencing. The presence of understory <i>S. kurilensis</i> strongly affected soil properties, including total carbon, total nitrogen, nitrate, and the C:N ratio as well as relative soil moisture. Marked differences were also noted in fungal and bacterial communities between plots. The relative abundance of the fungal phylum <i>Ascomycota</i> was 13.9% in the <i>Sasa</i>-intact plot and only 0.54% in the <i>Sasa</i>-removed plot. Among the <i>Ascomycota</i> fungi identified, the most prevalent were members of the family <i>Pezizaceae</i>. We found that the abundance of <i>Pezizaceae</i>, known to act as mycorrhizal fungi, was related to the amount of total carbon in the <i>Sasa</i>-intact plot. The relative abundance of <i>Proteobacteria</i> was significantly higher, whereas those of <i>Planctomycetes</i> and <i>Actinobacteria</i> were lower in the <i>Sasa</i>-intact plot than in the <i>Sasa</i>-removed plot. Furthermore, the results obtained suggest that some species of the phylum <i>Planctomycetes</i> are more likely to occur in the presence of <i>S. kurilensis</i>. Collectively, these results indicate that the presence of <i>S. kurilensis</i> affects microbial communities and soil properties in a <i>B. ermanii</i> boreal forest.</p>

Journal

  • Microbes and Environments

    Microbes and Environments 32(2), 103-111, 2017

    Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology · The Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130006789870
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1342-6311
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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