Lifestyle Changes and Oxidative Stress in a High-incidence Area of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in the Southwestern Kii Peninsula, Japan

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Author(s)

    • Kihira Tameko
    • Department of Health Sciences, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan
    • Kokubo Yasumasa
    • Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies, Mie University, Japan
    • Yoshida Sohei
    • Department of Health Sciences, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan
    • Sakurai Iori
    • Department of Health Sciences, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan
    • Arakawa Yuya
    • Department of Health Sciences, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan
    • Wakayama Ikuro
    • Department of Health Sciences, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan
    • Okumura Ryo
    • Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Japan
    • Iwai Keiko
    • Faculty of Nursing, Kansai University of Health Sciences, Japan

Abstract

<p><b>Objective </b>Lifestyle changes may play an important role in the incidence reduction and delay of onset age of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the Koza/Kozagawa/Kushimoto (K) area. The aim of this study was to evaluate recent lifestyle changes in the K area and to investigate the relationships between lifestyle and oxidative stress among the residents. </p><p><b>Methods </b>We conducted a medical checkup for elderly residents in the K area and the control area and evaluated the urinary 8-OHdG levels, cognitive function test scores and metal contents in serum and scalp hair, coupled with a lifestyle questionnaire survey between 2010 and 2015. </p><p><b>Results </b>Recent lifestyle changes among the K residents, including a decrease in the Japanese pickle consumption, increase in fresh vegetable consumption and decrease in farm work, were evaluated in this study. Low consumption of Japanese pickles, high consumption of fresh vegetables, rare farm work and low levels of 8-OHdG/creatinine were all associated with high scores in the cognitive function tests. Frequent farm work and consumption of Japanese pickles was associated with high contents of transition metals, such as Mn, Al and V, in the scalp hair. </p><p><b>Conclusion </b>These lifestyle changes among residents in the K area may be associated with their oxidative stress. </p>

Journal

  • Internal Medicine

    Internal Medicine 56(12), 1497-1506, 2017

    Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

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