A cross-sectional study on the periodontal status and prevalence of red complex periodontal pathogens in a Japanese population

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Author(s)

    • Chigasaki Otofumi
    • Tsukuba Healthcare Dental Clinic|Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Ishikawa Isao
    • Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University
    • Izumi Yuichi
    • Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Takeuchi Yasuo
    • Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Aoki Akira
    • Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Sasaki Yoshiyuki
    • Research and Industry-University Alliance Organization, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Mizutani Koji
    • Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Aoyama Norio
    • Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Interdisciplinary Medicine, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kanagawa Dental University
    • Ikeda Yuichi
    • Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
    • Gokyu Misa
    • Tsukuba Healthcare Dental Clinic|Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Abstract

<p>This large-scale study cross-sectionally examined the periodontal status and prevalence of "red complex" bacteria (<i>Porphyromonas gingivalis</i>, <i>Treponema denticola</i>, and <i>Tannerella forsythia</i>) in Japanese adults. A total of 977 participants were enrolled in the study. Probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and bone crest level (BCL) were recorded, and the presence of red complex bacteria in the saliva was examined using polymerase chain reaction. The mean BCL value and the percentage of sites with a PD ≥4 mm or the presence of BOP were significantly higher in older participants. The detection rates of <i>P. gingivalis</i>, <i>T. denticola</i>, and <i>T. forsythia</i> were 46.3%, 76.4%, and 61.1%, respectively. The <i>P. <i>gingivalis</i> detection rate significantly increased with age, while those of <i>T. denticola</i> and <i>T. forsythia</i> were comparably high for all age groups. A close correlation between <i>P. gingivalis</i> and the percentage of sites with PD ≥4 mm was indicated by nonlinear canonical correlation analysis. Current smokers exhibited a more advanced disease condition and a significantly higher <i>P. gingivalis</i> detection rate than non-smokers. In conclusion, periodontal condition worsens with age, and <i>P. gingivalis</i> appears to be the red complex bacterium most closely associated with periodontitis. </i></p>

Journal

  • Journal of Oral Science

    Journal of Oral Science 60(2), 293-303, 2018

    Nihon University School of Dentistry

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