The optimal age for epicutaneous sensitization following tape-stripping in BALB/c mice

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Author(s)

    • Tamari Masato
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development|Department of Pediatrics, Jikei University School of Medicine
    • Orimo Keisuke
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development|First Department of Medicine, Tokyo Women's Medical University
    • Motomura Kenichiro
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development
    • Arae Ken
    • Department of Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyorin University
    • Matsuda Akio
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development
    • Nakae Susumu
    • Laboratory of Systems Biology, Center for Experimental Medicine and Systems Biology, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo
    • Saito Hirohisa
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development
    • Morita Hideaki
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development
    • Matsumoto Kenji
    • Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development

Abstract

<p><i>Background:</i> Direct contact of food proteins with eczematous lesions is thought to be the main cause of epicutaneous sensitization. To further investigate the development and pathogenesis of food allergy <i>in vivo</i>, a good mouse model of epicutaneous sensitization is needed. However, a fundamental problem in that regard is that the optimal age for epicutaneous sensitization of mice is unknown. In this study, we attempted to elucidate that optimal age.</p><p><i>Methods:</i> Dorsal skin of wild-type BALB/c female mice (1, 3, 8 and 24 weeks old) was shaved, depilated and tape-stripped. A Finn chamber containing a 20-μl-aliquot of 20-mg/ml (OVA) was applied to the tape-stripped skin on 3 consecutive days/week, for 3 weeks. The body temperature was measured after intraperitoneal OVA challenge. Serum OVA-specific IgE titers and OVA-induced cytokine production by spleen cells were measured by ELISA. Dendritic cells (DCs) that migrated to the draining lymph nodes were quantified by FITC-labeled OVA and flow cytometry. The mRNA expression levels in the dorsal skin were measured by qPCR.</p><p><i>Results:</i> A significant age-dependent body temperature decline was observed after OVA challenge. The serum OVA-specific IgE titer, OVA-induced cytokine production (i.e., IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) by spleen cells, and number of FITC-OVA-engulfing DCs increased with age. In addition, mRNA for IL-33, but not TSLP or IL-25, was significantly induced in the skin by tape-stripping and increased with age.</p><p><i>Conclusions:</i> Twenty-four-week-old mice showed the greatest DC migration, Th2 polarization, IgE production and body temperature decline. Skin-derived IL-33 is likely to play key roles in those changes.</p>

Journal

  • Allergology International

    Allergology International 67(3), 380-387, 2018

    Japanese Society of Allergology

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