Impact of Nicotine Transport across the Blood–Brain Barrier: Carrier-Mediated Transport of Nicotine and Interaction with Central Nervous System Drugs

Access this Article

Author(s)

Abstract

<p>Nicotine, an addictive substance, is absorbed from the lungs following inhalation of tobacco smoke, and distributed to various tissues such as liver, brain, and retina. Recent <i>in vivo</i> and <i>in vitro</i> studies suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport process in nicotine transport in the lung, liver, and inner blood–retinal barrier. In addition, <i>in vivo</i> studies of influx and efflux transport of nicotine across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) revealed that blood-to-brain influx transport of nicotine is more dominant than brain-to-blood efflux transport of nicotine. Uptake studies in TR-BBB13 cells, which are an <i>in vitro</i> model cell line of the BBB, suggest the involvement of H<sup>+</sup>/organic cation antiporter, which is distinct from typical organic cation transporters, in nicotine transport at the BBB. Moreover, inhibition studies in TR-BBB13 cells showed that nicotine uptake was significantly reduced by central nervous system (CNS) drugs, such as antidepressants, anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs, and anti-Parkinson's disease drugs, suggesting that the nicotine transport system can recognize these molecules. The cumulative evidence would be helpful to improve our understanding of smoking-CNS drug interaction for providing appropriate medication.</p>

Journal

  • Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin

    Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 41(9), 1330-1336, 2018

    The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007479904
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10885497
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0918-6158
  • NDL Article ID
    029184907
  • NDL Call No.
    Z53-V41
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
Page Top