Maneuverability of Impedance-Controlled Motion in a Human-Robot Cooperative Task System

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Abstract

<p>This paper presents an evaluation of the maneuverability of impedance-controlled robot motion during a human-robot cooperative positioning task. The objectives of this study are to reveal the results of a quantitative evaluation of the maneuverability of robot motion and to investigate the relationship between the results of the quantitative evaluation and an operator's higher-order brain activity. Control strategies for the robot that are adequate for human-robot interaction have not yet been explicitly determined because of the difficulty in evaluating the maneuverability of robot motion. First, we analyzed the time normalized position and force/torque trajectories to reveal the characteristics of human motion and performed subjective evaluations for three types of impedance-controlled robot motion, which were controlled using the following strategies: (i) ordinary impedance control, (ii) impedance control with virtual Coulomb friction involved in the robot motion, and (iii) impedance control with a trajectory guidance force. Second, to confirm the analysis results based on the observed trajectories, we investigated differences in the operator's higher-order brain activity when using the different control strategies by using a functional near-infrared spectroscopy system. The experimental results confirmed the relationship between the analysis results of the control strategies, the motion of the operator, and higher-order brain activity. Consequently, the investigation conducted in this study is effective for evaluating the maneuverability of robot motion during a human-robot cooperative task.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics

    Journal of Robotics and Mechatronics 29(4), 746-756, 2017

    Fuji Technology Press Ltd.

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007519814
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10809998
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0915-3942
  • NDL Article ID
    028411910
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-G550
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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