Asymmetry of force generation and neuromuscular activity during multi-joint isometric exercise

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Abstract

<p></p><p>The purposes of the present study were (a) to determine whether a self-reported dominant leg was consistent with a dominant leg of force generation by using the isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP) tests and (b) identify the features of bilateral IMTP (IMTP<sub>Bi</sub>) and unilateral IMTP (IMTP<sub>Uni</sub>) in terms of detecting strength imbalance of athletes. Fifteen male collegiate athletes performed IMTP<sub>Uni</sub> and IMTP<sub>Bi</sub>. The ground reaction force and surface electromyography were sampled with 1000Hz to assess force generation and neuromuscular activities in the gluteus maximus (G<sub>max</sub>), gluteus medius (G<sub>med</sub>), semitendinosus (ST), biceps femoris (BF), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) during IMTP. Legs were separated into dominant and non-dominant leg categories in accordance with two types of definitions including self-reported dominance of kicking leg and dominance of force generation in IMTP. In force generation and neuromuscular activity of IMTP<sub>Bi</sub> and IMTP<sub>Uni</sub>, there was no significant difference between self-reported dominant and non-dominant leg. However, results for a self-reported dominant leg were not consistent with results for dominant leg determined by force generation. In addition, the dominant leg of force generation exerted significantly larger PF than non-dominant leg, and the magnitude of asymmetry in IMTP<sub>Bi</sub> was significantly larger than that of IMTP<sub>Uni</sub>. Moreover, in IMTP<sub>Bi</sub>, the neuromuscular activity of the VL of the dominant leg of force generation was significantly larger than that of the non-dominant leg. Therefore, it was suggested the necessity to distinguish the two types of IMTP tests because of the possibility that the strength imbalances detected by IMTP<sub>Bi</sub> and IMTP<sub>Uni</sub> would have different connotations.</p>

Journal

  • The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine

    The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine 8(1), 37-44, 2019

    The Japanese Society of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007580496
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA12573156
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    2186-8131
  • NDL Article ID
    029479099
  • NDL Call No.
    Z76-A776
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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