Generation of hydrogen sulfide from sulfur assimilation in <i>Escherichia coli</i>

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Author(s)

    • Tanaka Naoyuki
    • Gradutate of School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
    • Hatano Tomoyuki
    • Centre for Mechanochemical Cell Biology and Division of Biomedical Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick
    • Saito Soshi
    • Technical Research Laboratories, Kyowa Hakko Bio, Ltd.
    • Abe Tetsuya
    • Technical Research Laboratories, Kyowa Hakko Bio, Ltd.
    • Kawano Yusuke
    • Gradutate of School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
    • Ohtsu Iwao
    • Gradutate of School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba

Abstract

<p>Many organisms produce endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H<sub>2</sub>S) as a by-product of protein, peptide, or L-cysteine degradation. Recent reports concerning mammalian cells have demonstrated that H<sub>2</sub>S acts as a signaling molecule playing important roles in various biological processes. In contrast to mammals, bacterial H<sub>2</sub>S signaling remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that <i>Escherichia coli</i> generates H<sub>2</sub>S through the assimilation of inorganic sulfur, without L-cysteine degradation. Comparison of phenotypes and genomes between laboratory <i>E. coli</i> K-12 strains revealed a major contribution of CRP (a protein that controls the expression of numerous genes involved in glycolysis) to H<sub>2</sub>S generation. We found that H<sub>2</sub>S was produced by cells growing in a synthetic minimal medium containing thiosulfate as a sole inorganic sulfur source, but not in a medium only containing sulfate. Furthermore, <i>E. coli</i> generated H<sub>2</sub>S in a CRP-dependent manner as a response to glucose starvation. These results indicate that CRP plays a key role in the generation of H<sub>2</sub>S coupled to thiosulfate assimilation, whose molecular mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we propose a potential biological role of the H<sub>2</sub>S as a signaling mediator for a cross-talk between carbon and sulfur metabolism in <i>E. coli</i>.</p>

Journal

  • The Journal of General and Applied Microbiology

    The Journal of General and Applied Microbiology, 2019

    Applied Microbiology, Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Research Foundation

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