Conductive Iron Oxides Promote Methanogenic Acetate Degradation by Microbial Communities in a High-Temperature Petroleum Reservoir

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Author(s)

    • KATO SOUICHIRO Kato Souichiro
    • Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University|Bioproduction Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)
    • KITAGAWA WATARU Kitagawa Wataru
    • Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University|Bioproduction Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)
    • KAMAGATA YOICHI Kamagata Yoichi
    • Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University|Bioproduction Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)|Bioproduction Research Institute, AIST

Abstract

<p>Supplementation with conductive magnetite particles promoted methanogenic acetate degradation by microbial communities enriched from the production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir. A microbial community analysis revealed that <i>Petrothermobacter</i> spp. (phylum <i>Deferribacteres</i>), known as thermophilic Fe(III) reducers, predominated in the magnetite-supplemented enrichment, whereas other types of Fe(III) reducers, such as <i>Thermincola</i> spp. and <i>Thermotoga</i> spp., were dominant under ferrihydrite-reducing conditions. These results suggest that magnetite induced interspecies electron transfer via electric currents through conductive particles between <i>Petrothermobacter</i> spp. and methanogens. This is the first evidence for possible electric syntrophy in high-temperature subsurface environments.</p>

Journal

  • Microbes and Environments

    Microbes and Environments 34(1), 95-98, 2019

    Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology · The Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007627745
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11551577
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1342-6311
  • NDL Article ID
    029596481
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-J644
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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