Metastatic Malignant Lymphoma Mimicking Cerebral Toxoplasmosis with the "Target Sign"

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Author(s)

    • Ueno Hiroki
    • Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Maruyama Hirofumi
    • Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Norose Kazumi
    • Department of Infection and Host Defense, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan
    • Kamimura Teppei
    • Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Mihara Keichiro
    • Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Yamasaki Fumiyuki
    • Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Hikosaka Kenji
    • Department of Infection and Host Defense, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan
    • J. Amatya Vishwa
    • Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Takeshima Yukio
    • Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan
    • Kurisu Kaoru
    • Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Japan

Abstract

<p>We herein report the case of a 60-year-old man with a "target sign" in the left frontal lobe on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is thought to be a specific sign of cerebral toxoplasmosis. <sup>18</sup>F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography showed no increased uptake, and <sup>201</sup>Tl-single photon emission computed tomography showed the focal uptake in the left frontal lesion. On a brain biopsy, the patient was given a definitive diagnosis of brain metastasis from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and cerebral toxoplasmosis was excluded. In the present case, multilayer intensities on MRI may reflect the fast-growing nature of this tumor. </p>

Journal

  • Internal Medicine

    Internal Medicine 58(8), 1157-1162, 2019

    The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

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