Lipopolysaccharide and inflammatory cytokines levels decreased after sleeve gastrectomy in Chinese adults with obesity

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Author(s)

    • Li Ying
    • Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China|Department of Endocrinology, Northern Jiangsu People's Hospital, Yangzhou, Jiangsu 225001, China
    • Guan Wei
    • Department of General Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Ma Shuai
    • Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Lin Shibo
    • Department of General Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Yang Ningli
    • Department of General Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Liu Ruiping
    • Department of General Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Liang Hui
    • Department of General Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
    • Zhou Hongwen
    • Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China

Abstract

<p>Obesity is linked to a low-grade systemic inflammation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key factor. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) can significantly cause weight loss, but few reports have looked into the changes of LPS and inflammatory cytokines after surgery. To explore the potential short-term impact of SG on LPS and inflammatory cytokines and their relationship to early metabolic changes in obesity. 30 Chinese adults with obesity (BMI 39.37 ± 8.22 kg/m<sup>2</sup>, 25 female) receiving SG were included in this study. Fasting blood samples were collected at baseline and 30 days after SG. Serum LPS markedly reduced from 336.50 (73.54, 500) pg/mL to 5.00 (5.00, 5.24) pg/mL at 1 month after SG (<i>p</i> < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in plasma IL-6, IL-8, and serum CRP after SG (all <i>p</i> < 0.05). Insulin resistance improved remarkably after surgery as displayed by reductions in fasting insulin level (FINS, <i>p</i> < 0.001), and HOMA-IR (<i>p</i> < 0.001). In addition, visceral fat area (VFA) decreased from 209.70 ± 39.96 cm<sup>2</sup> to 193.28 ± 43.68 cm<sup>2</sup> after SG (<i>p</i> < 0.001). LPS was positively correlated with FINS (<i>r</i> = 0.391, <i>p</i> = 0.033) and HOMA-IR (<i>r</i> = 0.38, <i>p</i> = 0.038) before SG. Meanwhile, VFA was positively associated with CRP (<i>r</i> = 0.388, <i>p</i> = 0.034) before surgery. When assessing 30-days postoperative changes, a positive correlation was found between the variations of LPS, IL-8 and the reduction of VFA. After multivariate analyses, only the reduced IL-8 level was independently associated with the reduction of VFA (<i>p</i> = 0.015). In conclusion, SG can significantly relieve the inflammation in obesity in the short term and LPS might be an earlier predictor of inflammatory changes after surgery.</p>

Journal

  • Endocrine Journal

    Endocrine Journal 66(4), 337-347, 2019

    The Japan Endocrine Society

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