Urinary trimethyl tin reflects blood trimethyl tin in workers recycling organotins

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Author(s)

    • Ichihara Gaku
    • Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science
    • Iida Mayu
    • Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science
    • Watanabe Eri
    • Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science
    • Fujie Tomoya
    • Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science
    • Kaji Toshiyuki
    • Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science
    • Lee Eunmi
    • Department of Neurology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine
    • Kim Yangho
    • Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine

Abstract

<p><b>Aim</b>: Our recent case report of organotin intoxication showed higher ratio of urinary trimethyl tin (TMT) to dimethyl tin (DMT) than those of the previous cases exposed to only DMT, suggesting co-exposure to DMT and TMT occurred. The present study investigated how urinary TMT and DMT reflect blood TMT and DMT, respectively, to evaluate them as biomarkers for TMT/DMT exposure.</p><p><b>Methods</b>: DMT and TMT from blood collected at different time points from three patients intoxicated with organotins were measured with HPLC-ICP/MS. Previously published data of urinary DMT and TMT were used for comparison. Regression analyses were conducted with dependent variable of blood DMT and TMT and independent variable of urinary DMT and TMT, respectively. Multiple regression analysis with dummy variables of individual was also conducted.</p><p><b>Results</b>: Regression analysis did not show significant relation of urinary TMT to blood TMT or relation of urinary DMT to blood DMT, although the former was marginal. Multiple regression analysis showed significantly positive relation of urinary TMT to blood TMT.</p><p><b>Conclusions</b>: The study shows that urinary TMT reflects blood TMT. In co-exposure to TMT and DMT, urinary TMT can be an internal exposure marker of TMT, which might be not only derived from external exposure to TMT but also converted from DMT in human body.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Occupational Health

    Journal of Occupational Health 61(3), 257-260, 2019

    Japan Society for Occupational Health

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