Influence of Percolation Patterns on Copper Uptake, and Growth and Yield with Copper-polluted Stratified Paddy Fields

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Author(s)

    • FAN JINHUN
    • The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Iwate University
    • KATO CHIHIRO
    • Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University
    • ENDO AKIRA
    • Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University
    • LI SONGTAO
    • The United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Iwate University

Abstract

<p>Copper(Cu), arsenic, and cadmium are designated as specific substances of the Agricultural Land Soil Pollution Prevention Act in Japan. It has been known that high Cu concentrations in soil layers reduce rice crop production and therefore agricultural practices such as soil dressing have been applied to minimize damage to crops by Cu pollution. In this study, we investigated the effects of percolation patterns of the plowsole and the subsoil on growth and yield, and Cu uptake of paddy rice. Four stratified paddy field models were constructed to conduct growth tests under the condition that the percolation patterns of plowsole and subsoil were in an open or closed system. These models had a plow layer and an upper plowsole made with 12.5cm-thickness of non-polluted soil dressing (3.7 mg/kg) and underlying 15cm-thickness of a polluted lower plowsole and a subsoil layer whose Cu concentrations were either higher (approximately 250 mg/kg) or lower (approximately 70 mg/kg) than Japanese safety standards (125 mg/kg). During the tests, a constant water-ponding system was adopted, and mid-summer drainage was not done. As a result, Cu concentrations in the rice grains were 5% significantly higher in the open system percolation models regardless of the original amount of Cu in the plowsole and subsoil. On the other hand, we did not recognize the significant difference in growth and yield of rice plants among the models. We concluded that the Cu concentrations in rice plants were affected by percolation patterns of the polluted plowsole and subsoil even though they were covered with non-polluted soil dressing layers.</p>

Journal

  • International Journal of Environmental and Rural Development

    International Journal of Environmental and Rural Development 9(1), 101-108, 2018

    Institute of Environmental Rehabilitation and Conservation, Research Center

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007826953
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    2185-159X
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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