Factors related to physical and mental components of quality of life in the community-dwelling frail older persons

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Author(s)

    • Maki Naoki
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Kikuchi Shinji
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Goto Yukinobu
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Ichimura Hideo
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Sato Yukio
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Yanagi Hisako
    • Department of Medical Science and Welfare, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba: 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan
    • Takata Yu
    • AHR Medical and Welfare College School, Japan
    • Ashoka Wijesinghe
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Saeki Yusuke
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Kitazawa Shinsuke
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    • Kobayashi Naohiro
    • Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Abstract

<p> [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with changes in both the physical and mental components of quality of life (QOL) in of community-dwelling frail older persons in long-term care and to clarify which aspects are important to maintaining physical and mental components of QOL. [Participants and Methods] In this 1 year follow-up cohort study, participants were older persons from a single day care rehabilitation center in Japan. The Medical Outcome Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (MOS-SF8), which gives both physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores, was used as the main QOL assessment. Participants were divided according to their level of QOL maintenance according to changes in PCS and MCS scores over the study period, and the variables were compared between the groups. [Results] PCS domain was significantly associated with forced vital capacity and the MCS domain was significantly associated with the Geriatric Depression Scale and Dysphagia Risk Assessment for the Community-Dwelling Elderly Test. [Conclusion] Depression, reduced pulmonary function, and reduced deglutition ability were independently related to low QOL. Assessment of these factors could be beneficial for maintaining the physical and mental components of QOL in community-dwelling frail older persons in long-term care.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Physical Therapy Science

    Journal of Physical Therapy Science 32(9), 557-562, 2020

    The Society of Physical Therapy Science

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007894594
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0915-5287
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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