Physique at Birth and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Japanese Urban Residents: the KOBE Study

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Author(s)

    • Umemoto Kaori
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
    • Kuwabara Kazuyo
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Miyazaki Junji
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Kadota Aya
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science
    • Iida Miho
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
    • Sugiyama Daisuke
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Faculty of Nursing and Medical Care, Keio University
    • Miyamatsu Naomi
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Department of Clinical Nursing, Shiga University of Medical Science
    • Miyamoto Yoshihiro
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Open Innovation Center, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
    • Okamura Tomonori
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Kubo Sachimi
    • Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Nishida Yoko
    • Osaka Institute of Public Health|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Higashiyama Aya
    • Department of Hygiene, Wakayama Medical University|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Kawamura Kuniko
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Kubota Yoshimi
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine
    • Hirata Takumi
    • Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe|Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Faculty of Medicine
    • Hirata Aya
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe
    • Sata Mizuki
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine|Cohort Study Team, Center for Cluster Development and Coordination, Foundation for Biomedical Research and Innovation at Kobe

Abstract

<p><b>Aim: </b>This study investigated the relationship between birth physique and cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese urban residents aged 40 years and more.<b> </b></p><p><b>Methods:</b> A self-administered questionnaire on birth physique was performed among 624 individuals (165 men and 459 women) who participated in the KOBE study. We examined whether self-reported birth physique and available recorded birth weights matched for 72 participants. Then the association between birth physique and risk factors for all participants was examined by gender. Body size at birth in the questionnaire (large, medium, small) was set as an exposure and laboratory values from the baseline survey (2010-2011) were used as outcomes.<b> </b></p><p><b>Results: </b>Mean (standard deviation) recorded birth weight of 72 participants was 3665 (318), 3051 (300), and 2653 (199) g, in the large, medium, and small group, respectively. In the analysis for all participants, odds ratio for having both hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance were significantly higher in the small versus large birth weight group, which was 7.42 (95% CI 1.75–31.50) for men and 4.44 (95% CI 1.14–17.30) for women after adjusting for age, body mass index, smoking/alcohol/exercise habits, and menstrual status in women. Similar results were observed in participants with recorded birth weight.<b> </b></p><p><b>Conclusions: </b>The present study indicates that individuals with small physique at birth might be at higher risk for hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance in middle age compared to those with large birth weight.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

    Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis, 2020

    Japan Atherosclerosis Society

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130007952497
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1340-3478
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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